Unusual car powers charity
Strathspey Herald 05 August, 2009
The village of Aviemore has witnessed many spectacles of all shapes and sizes over the years, but this week saw a first when a custom-built steam-powered car, on an historic charity drive from John O’Groats to Lands End, called in. Steam enthusiasts Dean Rogers and Steve Baldock are driving the 991 miles in a specially built Lykamobile, based on the famous Locomobiles of the early 1900s, and are doing the run in support of Hearing Dogs for Deaf People. The charity trains dogs to alert their deaf owners to everyday sounds like doorbells, oven timers and telephones, and also emergency noises like smoke alarms. Mr Rogers said: “After meeting one of the hearing dogs, I was so impressed with the whole idea of using dogs to help deaf people that I just wanted to help, so I built a plan, and a steam car! “I have been so surprised by how few people have heard about the hearing dogs and I want to raise a significant amount of money for it.”


Pictured with the steam-powered car (from left) are James McLeod (12), Tiree Rodden (6), driver Dean Rogers, Mrs Jean Cassidy, Gerry McGee (seated), chief executive of the Macdonald Highland Resort, Aviemore, with King Charles spaniel Bobby, Jean’s Hearing for the Deaf Dog. Front, right is six-year-old Lucy Taylor.

By co-incidence, newly qualified hearing dog owner Jean Cassidy is celebrating her 40th wedding anniversary on holiday in Aviemore. She said: “Bobby my hearing dog has made such a difference to my life as he goes everywhere with me. He has given me tremendous confidence in knowing that if anything happens he will alert me, not only at home, to the doorbell, phone and smoke alarm, but outside as well. “I wish I had applied years ago instead of struggling along as in the past seven months Bobby has enriched my life and my husband’s who says that he has been trying for 40 years to get me up in the morning and Bobby has done it from day one.” Dean and Steve also welcomed children from the National Deaf Children’s Society in the area, who gave the car a safe send-off from the Macdonald Four Seasons Hotel in Aviemore on Monday. The Lykamobile has an average speed of 10 to 15 miles per hour, with a top speed of just 37 miles per hour. It has to stop once every hour to take on more water, and it has to be topped up with diesel twice a day. There will also be stops en-route for fundraising and special events. The car will be a star attraction at several steam rallies, and people can donate money in return for a ride. Dean and Steve’s company, Steam Traction World, a UK firm specialising in making large-scale models of steam cars that people then assemble at home, is bearing the costs of the trip.

Lykamobile JoG to Lands End Challenge
Caledonian Classic & Historic Motorsport Club 04 August, 2009
I met up with the hardy crew on the promenade at South Queensferry, complete with fitting background of the Forth Railway Bridge, built in the age when steam was king. With 286 miles of the 1000 miles under their belt the crew were only one hour behind their schedule, a major feat as near disaster had struck yesterday when the boiler superheater broke between Aviemore and Perth on the old A9. Speaking to Dean Rogers, one of the crew, it meant almost a complete engine strip to repair the problem. Four hours later they were on their way at the best part of 15 mph. The little car can get up to 30mph, but would you like to sit up there at that speed. Though the car is fitted with disc brakes, they looked like 5 inch jobs to me, it takes a steady hand to stop without tipping it or going over the tiller. Steve Baldock told me that some frustrated car drivers had been a bit naughty and pulled in quickly after overtaking. Try explaining how you were shunted by a Steam Car to your insurance company! I left them as they headed of to Coatbrdge and sponsor DHL, who were providing the diesel fuel that is used to heat the boiler, some 2000 litres in all. The car is not the most economic and manages about 8 miles on a tank of water. To ensure the run is accurate the Lykamobile returned to South Queensferry to continue its journey to Dalkeith, Jedburgh and over the border to Newcastle. Report and Photographs – Jim Paterson

Lykamobile reaches Newcastle
6th August 2009
En route from John O Groats to Lands End the Lykamobile meets a very special guest at Newcastle.
steam car Newcastle
Newcastle Central Station. The Lykamobile had a warm reception.
lykamobile Newcastle
Back on the road!

Pool aces pot cash for dogs on steam trip Stoke Sentinel
Monday, August 10, 2009
POOL stars Carl Morris and Adam Davies showed off their skills for a good cause by taking on all-comers last night. The pair were at Stoke’s Civic Centre to cue up against members of the public in a bid to raise funds and awareness for charity Hearing Dogs For Deaf People. World number three Carl is currently supporting friends Dean Rogers and Steve Baldock in their attempt to earn cash for the charity by travelling the length of the UK in a steam-powered car. Yesterday, he joined them on a run from Manchester to Stoke-on-Trent. Today they will continue on to Birmingham. While Carl’s journey will end in Bristol, Dean and Steve will carry on to Land’s End, having started their journey at John O’Groats. At each stop Carl will be challenging the public to a game of pool and showing off his trick shot skills in exchange for charity donations. Yesterday he got fellow professional Adam to take part as well. Hearing Dogs for Deaf People is close to Carl’s heart, as he lost his hearing to meningitis at the age of three and now has his own hearing dog, Ingle. The 30-year-old, from Weston Road, Meir, said: “In 2001 my house was struck by lightning, and I didn’t realise the roof was on fire. In the end my neighbour broke my door down and rescued me, and it made me realise how dependent I was on other people. If my neighbour hadn’t been there I would have been dead. “I hadn’t even heard of hearing dogs before then, but I found out how useful they are and applied to get one. Whenever anyone is at the door Ingle lets me know.” Richard Booth, whose dad Phil has a hearing dog of his own, was the first of Carl’s victims last night. The 27-year-old from Fenton managed to pot three balls before a fluffed shot allowed Carl to effortlessly clear up. He said: “That was very nerve-wracking. I play snooker with my dad, and I played pool at uni, but obviously not enough.” The event was supported by Stoke-on-Trent Lord Mayor Councillor Jean Bowers, whose chosen charity for the year is Hearing Dogs for Deaf People. She said: “When I first heard about the Steam Car Challenge they weren’t originally going to stop at Stoke-on-Trent, but I asked if they could as it is Carl’s home.” Dean and Steve, who make and sell steam cars in kit form, started their trip on August 2 and hope to finish on August 16 Their Lykamobile steam car has a top speed of 37mph. Dean, aged 39, from Daventry, said: “We’ve broken down nine times so far, and the longest we’ve been stuck by the roadside has been four-and-a-half hours, but it’s been a good trip.”

Steaming off from Daventry to raise money for charity Daventry Express 30 June 2009
A STEAM-POWERED car and its drivers from a Daventry company will be motoring the length of Britain to raise money for charity. Dean Rogers and Steve Baldock, directors of Steam Traction World based on Daventry’s Royal Oak industrial estate, will be taking one of their Lykamobile cars along the 991-mile route from John O’Groats to Lands End in August to raise money for the Hearing Dogs charity. Their trip is likely to be the first time in around 100 years that a similar design of car has made the journey. Mr Rogers said: “The thing is we’ve never done more than 50 miles with this car, and for this trip we’ll be doing nearly 1,000. “A big issue will be the water – it does about one mile per gallon, and although we’re going to take a container of water with us, it won’t be enough. “We think it’s going to take us about two weeks, but if there’s any problems and we have to rebuild the engine then it might take us three weeks. “I know more modern steam cars – from the 1920s – have done the trip, but they can reach speeds of 60mph.” The team are hoping to raise a total of £100,000 for Hearing Dogs, and the charity is hoping to organise a whole series of events at various stops along the way. Steam Traction World specialises in large-scale models of various machines, sold in kit form. The car being used for the trip is a modern replica of a 1900s Stanley steam car and has a top speed of 30 or 35mph, but the pair are expecting to average just 10mph. Although built to a classic design, the Lykamobile has a number of modern features. Firstly the rather dangerous original kerosene burner has been replaced with a diesel heater for the water and the car also has modern brakes. It must stop once an hour for water, and at least twice a day for diesel. Mr Rogers said: “When we first took one out on the road we only had the original brake on the diff. We were going along and there was a lorry coming towards us and we couldn’t get it to stop so we put modern disc brakes on it.” The company is looking for local businesses to sponsor the trip, and all money given will go directly to the charity as the pair are covering their own costs.

A steamy trip for charity . . .
Tavistock Today Monday, August 17, 2009
DINGLES Fairground Heritage Centre near Lifton is gearing up to welcome a custom-built steam car on an historic charity drive from John O’Groats to Lands End, to raise money for Hearing Dogs for Deaf People. Dean Rogers and Steve Baldock are driving the 991 miles in a specially built steam car ‘Lykamobile’, based on the famous Locomobiles of the early 1900s. It is the first time in around 100 years that a car like this has made the journey. Dean was inspired to raise funds for Hearing Dogs for Deaf People by his friend Carl Morris, who has a hearing dog called Ingle. Dean said: ‘I was so impressed with the whole idea of using dogs to help deaf people that I just wanted to help, so I built a plan — and a steam car. I have been so surprised by how few people have heard about the Hearing Dogs charity and I want to raise a significant amount of money for it.’ Dean set off from John O’Groats on August 2 and the whole journey is expected to last just over two weeks. The Lykamobile has an average speed of 10 to 15 miles per hour, with a top speed of just 37 miles per hour. It has to stop once every hour to take on more water, and it has to be topped up with diesel twice a day. The Lykamobile will be arriving at the Dingles Fairground Heritage Centre at around noon tomorrow (Friday). All are welcome to come along and see the car, meet local hearing dogs and puppies and to find out more about the charity’s work. Attending the event will be Tavistock mayor Mandy Govier and West Devon deputy mayor John Hockridge. Refreshments will be available in the centre’s café and everyone who attends will be able to make a day of it by having a look around the centre, which has fairground rides, working steam engines and vintage machinery. Entry charges apply for the centre’s exhibits only. Cost is £7 for adults, £5 for children/senior, family tickets are also available. Hearing Dogs for Deaf People is a national charity that trains dogs to alert their deaf owners to everyday sounds like doorbells, oven timers and telephones, and also emergency noises like smoke alarms. Dean’s company Steam Traction World, a UK firm specialising in making large scale models of steam cars that people then assemble at home, is bearing the costs of the trip. All donations will go to the charity.

Steam Car Challenge – Press